Feast your eyes on this – Yellow Dawn RPG article grabs headline in latest issue of Forever Folio

FOREVER FOLIO 3 July 2015

Ezine for the indy RPG publisher Forever People

I’m very pleased by this. A lengthy and in-depth article that includes artwork, background details on the world of Yellow Dawn – The Age of Hastur and a full interview with me by Dave Sharrock. Take a peek.

Download now (click)

Cover of Forever Folio - issue 3 July 2015 featuring headline article about Yellow Dawn - The Age of Hastur by science fiction dark fantasy author David J Rodger

Cover of Forever Folio Issue 3

This issue:

Yellow Dawn – Modiphius prepare to bring David J Rodger’s awesome mythos-inspired post-apocalypse nightmare for CoC7e into the light of day.

Fighting Fantasy Special! – celebrating the master brand of FRP gamebooks, with a look at Jonathan Green’s book You Are the Hero and J P Montgomery’s graphic novel adaptation of Steve Jackson’s The Trolltooth Wars.

The Unsung Weave – a full serialized campaign setting for the Wyrd game with the third adventure in the series taking players into the northlands of Listholm in search of the missing duchess Coriola

EVPreview – a teaser for this month’s free EVP adventure – Smoke & Mirra’s Magic World.

Download now (click)pay what you want!

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Read Dream of a Shadow’s interview with me for Future Ways

Interview with David J Rodger

REBLOGGED FROM THE BRISTOL STORY TRAIL WEBSITE – READ THE ORIGINAL HERE

Tuesday 28th April – It’s a gorgeous sunny afternoon in Bristol. Down at the Brigstow Lounge on the harbour front, DoaS creator Toby Smith and Sci-Fi/Dark Fantasy author David J Rodger are talking storytelling, urban planning and the nature of reality ahead of the Redcliffe Future Way project this coming weekend (Friday 1st May 2015). It’s a big one, and a mind bender! Continue reading

History of a self-published writer – Part 1 – Interview by Mary Rajotte

Balancing a career and writing

Mary Rajotte - Toronto - Canadian Dark Fiction Writer and Blogger

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This is a quick shout out to let you know about an interview I did with Toronto based dark fiction writer, Mary Rajotte. Known for her atmospheric and creepy tales that explore myth, dream and nightmare, she’s very kindly taken time out of her hectic schedule to run this with me.

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M. Rajotte introduction: “Spending 24 years so far pursuing his passion for writing, Rodger shares what got him started, how he maintains his focus, and how he balances the pressures of career versus creativity in the first part of this interview series.”

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Q: What experiences inspired you to write?

DJR: I decided I wanted to be a writer when I was 19. It was 1989 and the Berlin Wall had just come down. Communism was collapsing, Capitalism and Democracy were striding hand in hand down the halls of the Military Industrial Complex towards the great Throne Room of Globalisation.

Meanwhile Cyberpunk was gaining ground as a much re-invigorated genre, after its earliest inception by Alfred Bester, thanks to the likes of William Gibson and characters like Max Headroom (both the music show and the TV series).

I was actually into the outre cosmic horror of H.P.Lovecraft at the time. My first novel was a God-awful mélange of 1920’s Cthulhu Mythos. I left my job of the moment to write it. That took me a year.

This coincided with a friendship of correspondence with Brian Lumley and a personal friendship with Denis MacEoin (aka Daniel Easterman and Jonathan Aycliffe): the messages were polite but clear –

You can read the full interview here via the Examiner.com {click}

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See more about Mary Rajotte!

You should check out Mary Rajotte’s work on her website her, includes links to her published work which are well worth a read (and a spooky shudder): http://maryrajotte.com


David J Rodger – DATA

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Interview with Julian Darius, founder of Sequart and Martian Lit: an insight into success whilst operating from the fringes

Interview with a publisher

Julian Darius publisher and founder of Sequart and Martian Lit

Julian Darius publisher and founder of Sequart and Martian Lit

Julian Darius. American. Logophile.  Founder of Sequart (advancing comics as art) and Martian Lit (offbeat and smart works in all genres and media).There’s something of the English author Will Self in his ways. And he is most certainly one of the web’s more interesting and enlightened characters.  Sometimes sardonic in humour, his personality packs a punch and may leave you reeling.  But in the movie-motif of Edward Norton as “narrator” in Fight Club, you may want to rub your jaw with a slick, spittle and blood smeared chin and say: hit me again.

It was Martian Lit that snagged my interest and a desire to talk to Julian about his personal philosophy and goals (for world domination?).

He has very kindly agreed to invest some of his time to place a few words here.

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Rumors we seek your planet’s humiliation are somewhat exaggerated

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DJR: Martian Lit was founded in 2011. Described as publishing odd and aggressive literature, non-fiction, art, poetry, and other material.  Was its creation an inevitable evolution from Sequart’s much more niche (high-brow) profile? Or something else?

This is going to be a way longer and more personal answer than you want, but I don’t know how to explain it any other way.

I’ve actually been a fiction writer much longer than a comics historian and critic. I read comics in childhood, and I thought about them, but I didn’t write about them. I did, however, write fiction, even as a little boy. I wrote my first novel, which was sci-fi, as a freshman in high school. It wasn’t a bad concept, but I still cringe remembering some of the bad sentences. By the time I left for college, I’d written most of another sci-fi novel, most of a vampire novel, a screenplay about a serial killer, and lots of odds and ends.

I actually wrote a Star Trek: The Next Generation script and submitted it. They rejected it because I hadn’t followed the rules — I’d created an alien species for the plot, and only staff writers were allowed to do that. I think I figured I’d break the rules intelligently and get away with it. Didn’t work out in that case, although they were very nice and praised the writing itself. By the time I got that rejection I’d plotted out several seasons of the show, which would have slowly shifted it into something of the kind of continuing storyline you now see, in the wake of the revived Battlestar Galactica or even post-Bablylon 5. It was great stuff.

Continue reading

Interview: Michael Bukowski – freelance Illustrator rooted in monsters, mythology, folklore and modern horror fiction

Inspiration of an illustrator

A short but insightful Q&A session with Michael Bukowski, an illustrator who has worked for numerous clients across the globe and even rode alongside several bands on tour across Europe and beyond.

Michael Bukowski - freelance illustrator

Mythology meets Mysticism – image by Michael Bukowski – All Rights Reserved

DJR: Hello Michael Bukowski. Thanks for taking time out to pen some words here.  You come across as a prolific creator and talented illustrator.  Do you consider yourself successful?  And how would you define yourself, in terms of being a creative?

Hey David! Thanks for the interviewing me. This is a bit of a hard question to answer because I’m not successful in the traditional sense of a freelance illustrator. I have to keep a part-time job at a gallery to stay afloat. I also prefer to work with mostly DIY bands and labels which limits your “success”. However, I have done artwork for over 300 clients on five different continents AND managed to get myself on 4 US tours, a European tour and an Asia/Australian tour with bands I’ve done work for….So, I’m successful in that respect? I don’t know if that answered anything.

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DJR: What are you currently working on?

I just finished up a poster design for a promoter in Arizona and I’ve been going back and forth on creature design for a movie. I also do work for a lot of group shows in Philadelphia and the surrounding area but mostly I’ve been working on my blog, which is probably what most of your readers will be familiar with.

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Michael Bukowski - freelance illustrator with occult and cthulhu mythos themes

Michael Bukowski – All Rights Reserved

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DJR: Linking into the above. What theme captures your artistic temperament and sees most creative output? What truly inspires you and gives you a tingle of delight to craft within? And conversely, what makes you want to pull your hair out. What concepts are your biggest challenge?

I love monsters, mythology, folklore and modern horror fiction. I think all of that stuff kinda rattles around in my brain together and then it spills out in some combination or another. In many ways I’m like that creepy horror nerd from an 80s movie (ie the kid from Deadly Spawn or Friday the 13th IV). I love the macabre and the morbid. So, when I’m asked to make art that’s always what I lean towards. I don’t have too many concepts that make me cringe. I’ve done work that I wasn’t too personally invested in but saw it as a challenge as an illustrator to make it interesting. There are some things that I simply won’t do and it says so in my contact information on my website. I will not do racist, sexist or homophobic artwork or work for bands that are racist sexist or homophobic.

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DJR: Where did you come from, physically, artistically and how did you reach this point in your life?  Any anecdotes you’d like to share with other creatives who are treading the same path?

I was born in Northern New Jersey and lived in various places in that area (Essex County specifically, think Sopranos) until I left to study at University Of the Arts in Philadelphia in 1997. I’ve been here ever since. I think both places have deeply affected my work. Both are super industrialized and urban, with little magic or nature. So, it’s not really a surprise that I retreated into books and movies that focus on the fantastic as a sort of escape. Don’t get me wrong, I had a good childhood, but as far as environment goes, it wasn’t too pretty.

My mother was always into horror literature. She read a lot of Stephen King, and as a result I read a bunch (probably when I was way too young) and got sucked in. My father (not a very good dad) would get me for the weekends and would let me rent two of whatever movie I wanted, then plop me in front of the TV for the next 24 hours. He seriously let me rent ANYTHING. I was twelve years old and watching things like Burial Ground and House By the Cemetery. It all made me the creep I am today.

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Michael Bukowski - freelance illustrator with occult and cthulhu mythos themes

Michael Bukowski – All Rights Reserved

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DJR: Any more strings to your bow?

Not really haha. I mean I love to travel and I do that a lot and I love horror movies and literature, but as far as an applicable skill that I could apply to the real world? Nope this is it. Which is fine with me because I love art. I can’t stop. I will continue to make art until I’m unable. Even if commissions dry up, I’ll still be plugging away at this blog/zine. And once that’s over, I’ll move on to other author’s work or a new project completely, but I won’t ever stop.

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DJR: Do you see the Cthulhu Mythos seeping further into mainstream awareness through cinema and fiction? Do you think this would be a good thing or a bad thing?  A validation of Lovecraft’s work after nearly a century of relegation to a “freakish” sub-genre – or an erosion of deliciously obscure niche that the Mythos sits within?

I tend to think that HPL’s influence on popular culture has peaked and will probably plateau. I can’t see his ideas and themes going out of fashion but I also can’t imagine anything more than the occasional reference in movies and television. Like, it’s great that season five of Buffy has a human embodiment of a universal gate as a character (not to mention the Dagon Sphere) but as far as actually seeing his bleak atheist ideas in popular culture…I can’t imagine it.

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Michael Bukowski - freelance illustrator with occult and cthulhu mythos themes

Michael Bukowski – All Rights Reserved

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DJR: How do you see the Occult and the Cthulhu Mythos side by side. Two entirely disparate systems or…. ?

Oh I think they’re entwined but that doesn’t bother me. I feel like I view the occult very similarly to Lovecraft himself. It’s all full of really intriguing concepts and imagery but in the end it’s all bunk. So I can understand him using some of a made up set of beliefs to cull together his own made up set of beliefs. Does that make sense?

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DJR: What’s your favourite source of inspiration (artist or otherwise)?

Aside from HPL and his circle,  I like looking at nature a lot. Pictures of fish, arthropods, weird plants.  I also love horror movies and horror fiction. I read all four Laird Barron books this summer as well as catching up on Clive Barker’s Books Of Blood Vol 1-6. World folklore and mythology as well. I don’t know how a lot of that seeps into my work but I think fractions of disparate sources congeal together in one piece. I also love The Key Of Solomon and it’s demon descriptions. I’ve totally directly interpreted a few of those.

In terms of artists, there are a ton. Geof Darrow, Charles Burns, Guy Davis, Mike Mignola, Dan Seagrave, Ed Repka, and then a bunch of local and lesser known artists. Jeanne D’Angelo, Trevor Henderson, Sam Heimer, Dylan Garrett Smith, Justin Gray,

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DJR: What’s coming up in your world that you’d like to shout about? Any links, events, promos you would like to share with the folks who look at this blog every month?

I have a piece coming up in Puffed Shoggoths (an HPL themed illustration zine) and I just finished a piece for a benefit group show called Countdown to (en)Danger here in Philly (for the World Wildlife Fund). Most important though, Volume III of Illustro Obscurum will be ready for Christmas (blasphemous!). Keep an eye on my blog for that. I also have a weeks worth of really obscure HPL deities ready to post in the week of October.

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David J Rodger – DATA

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