Discover a picture made from moving images, visually stunning and so rich that your mind will take years to digest it

The Fall (2006) is a visual masterpiece by director Tarsem Singh

I only discovered this movie existed after discussing the incredible scenes composed within the sci fi dark fantasy movie The Cell (2000). My friend, Gothic horror writer Thomas David Parker grinned with the delight of introducing (and infecting) my mind with this beautiful story, where every scene is perfectly framed and presented like a stunning painting. Tarsem Singh simply in his element. A small god at play in the laps of man, woman and child.

Jeetu Verma in  Tarsem Singh's incredible movie The Fall (2006) the character of The Indian as visualised by the young child Alexandria

Jeetu Verma as The Indian as visualised by the young child Alexandria

Listen to this as you read…

Symphony No. 7 by Ludwig van Beethoven, which he himself described as possibly one of his best works. I have not been able to get this piece out of my head since watching the movie The Fall (2006) in which it features heavily. The symphony premiered in Vienna 8th December 1813, with Beethoven conducting at a charity concert for wounded soldiers. In his address to the audience Beethoven said: “We are moved by nothing but pure patriotism and the joyful sacrifice of our powers for those who have sacrificed so much for us.”

Apt, because the movie itself deals with individuals wounded physically and psychologically.  Languishing in a hospital on the outskirts of Los Angeles, stuntman Roy Walker (Lee Pace) is broken in more ways than one. It’s the 1920s, crippled after a movie stunt goes wrong, Roy Walker wants nothing more that to go to sleep and never wake up. He befriends a young child who is there with a broken arm, and uses epic stories of fantasy and imagination to get her to help him fulfill his final desire.

The movie flips between fantasy, as told to the young child Alexandria – and the harsh reality of the stuntman unable to walk – or work – again, and determined to find a way to escape.  The fantasy sees five unlikely heroes brought together by the cruelty of the Governor Odious, setting out on a mission, or rather, seeking a meaning to their existence.

Lee Pace delivers a wonderful performance as the blunt instrument of revenge, the masked bandit but also the metaphor of the movie – hidden intent and determination regardless of the consequences.

Marcus Wesley as  Otta Benga in The Fall (2006)

Marcus Wesley as Otta Benga

Below, a lone figure cast upon the striking desert dune landscape – this is iconic of his style and a hallmark of Tarsem Singh.

The Fall (2006) - lone figure cast upon the striking desert dune landscape - iconic style and hallmark of Tarsem Singh

The Fall (2006)

The heroes…

The Fall (2006)  Tarsem Singh - beautifully surreal yet simple characters played by Marcus Wesley, Robin Smith, Lee Pace, Jeetu Verma and Leo Bill

Marcus Wesley, Robin Smith, Lee Pace, Jeetu Verma and Leo Bill

Their opposition. Dark soldiers of Governor Odious. Visually stunning allegorical story-telling.

The Fall (2006)  Tarsem Singh - visually stunning allegorical story telling - dark soldiers of Governor Odious

Dark soldiers of Governor Odious

The movie seamlessly blends fantasy and reality, technology and geography in a story of personal loss, revenge and private redemption.

The Fall (2006)  Tarsem Singh - visually stunning movie that seamlessly blends fantasy and reality, technology and geography in a fantastic story of personal loss, revenge and private redemption

The showdown

The Fall (2006) Tarsem Singh - Justine Waddell in a story that could only work in cinema, a story that defines the very role of cinema - a painting in moving pictures

Justine Waddell, every scene is a painting in moving pictures

The Fall (2006) Tarsem Singh - the unlikely heroes band together in a quest of bloody revenge - Otta Benga, Indian, Luigi, Masked Bandit and Darwin

Unlikely band of heroes: Otta Benga, Indian, Luigi, Masked Bandit and Darwin

PRODUCTION (links via IMDB)

WATCH THE TRAILER

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If you like epic stories with bold visuals, drama and potent characters, you may enjoy the post-apocalyptic thriller Dog Eat Dog.

Dog Eat Dog a good book to read by sci fi cyberpunk and thriller author David J Rodger - this is a post-apocalypse novel

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Dog Eat Dog is a post-apocalyptic crime thriller set in the shared universe of David J Rodger after the event called Yellow Dawn

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2 thoughts on “Discover a picture made from moving images, visually stunning and so rich that your mind will take years to digest it

  1. I loved this movie, (and this is one of my fave pieces of music). A visual delight. And Lee Pace’s performance really hooked me. I thought, whoa, this guy is talented. Why isn’t he a big leading man yet?

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