Travel: Morocco – March 2014 (part 3)

Morocco

If you missed the start of this journey, jump to the beginning  here:

DAY THREE

Morocco driving beyond Marrakech

Morocco, driving beyond Marrakech

Day 3 early start and road trip with a guide to Essaouira. It’s about a 3 hour drive each way but is worth it for the green plains with gently rolling hills, tree groves and then the coastal landscape with a sharp Atlantic breeze to take away the blunt hammer of the heat. Ate swordfish tagine at a place called Il Mare, recommended because of the terrace with a sea view and the fact it had a reputation for hygiene. Very good food, and they serve the ubiquitous Casablanca beer – which is very nice, strong and malty. Essaouira is a great place to wander for a few hours, stopping at small cafes in the main drag and exploring the alleyways.

 

Morocco driving beyond Marrakech open lands

Morocco, driving beyond Marrakech open lands

 

Morocco on the road to Essaouira Coca Cola in every village

Morocco on the road to Essaouira – Coca Cola in every village

 

Morocco on the road to Essaouira  - village cyber

Morocco, on the road to Essaouira – village cyber

Morocco on the road to Essaouira  - farmer inspects his field

Morocco on the road to Essaouira – farmer inspects his field

Morocco on the road to Essaouira  - goats in a tree

Morocco on the road to Essaouira – the Goat Tree

Essaouira

Morocco - Essaouira - narrow lane in old Medina

Essaouira – narrow lane in old Medina

 

Morocco - Essaouira - tourist stall in old Medina

Essaouira – tourist stall in old Medina

Morocco - Essaouira - medieval steps in old Medina - up or down

Essaouira – medieval steps

Morocco - Essaouira - coloured hand-painted glass street lamp in old Medina

Essaouira – coloured hand-painted glass street lamp in old Medina

Morocco - Essaouira - looking down from medieval fortress walls

Essaouira – looking down from medieval fortress walls

Morocco - Essaouira - ancient metal doors in old Medina

Essaouira – ancient metal doors in old Medina

Morocco - Essaouira - sea salt encrusted blue door and rusting metal fixtures in old Medina

Essaouira – blue door with salt and rust

Morocco - Essaouira -RAJA - sort-of street graffiti on wall of old Medina

Essaouira sort-of street graffiti on wall of old Medina

 

Photo of RAJA reminds me of my mate HIAB-X’s voice and they way he repeats the sound of his US phone when it announces it is calling Rodger.

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Morocco - Essaouira - man in blue denim old Medina

Morocco – Essaouira – man in blue denim old Medina

This guy sidled up beside me near the wall overlooking the sea and started to engage in conversation, in French. I couldn’t tell if he was a con man or rent boy but he stuck out like a sore thumb in his fancy denims and expensive red trainers. I blanked him. He turned and walked away. I followed him for a while and snapped this shot. He circled the square and then came back to try it again with another tourist.
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Morocco - Essaouira - street scene boy on bike - couple walking with shopping

Morocco – Essaouira – street scene

Morocco - Essaouira - street art probably to do with long gone tourist shop

Morocco – Essaouira – street art probably to do with long gone tourist shop

Morocco - Essaouira - people watching from a cafe

Morocco – Essaouira – people watching from a cafe

I spent some time sitting in a cafe, watching people walking by, the hustle of the square and the sense of easy space – sunlight on my face and a cool Atlantic breeze blowing in. All the birds are wheeling and shrieking above the fish being brought in to the nearby markets.

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Morocco - Essaouira - Charles Land-Reeves author of Boy

Morocco – Essaouira – Charles Land-Reeves author of Boy

March 2014. I met Charles in Marrakech. Struck up a conversation and shortly had my jaw hanging open with a glimpse into his life story. His mother was a Belgian opera singer. She toured the world. After marrying an English officer she gave birth to little Charles. World War II broke out. The English father was posted overseas in the Far East. Belgian mother and son travelled to reach him. At entry to the country she and the son were turned away because she didn’t have an English passport. She was unable to get word to her husband before she and her son were shipped away to an island – where the Japanese then invaded. Young Charles and his mother suffered a Japanese internment camp. After this ended, it took time to get back to Europe and the Englishman – who by now had been told his wife and child were dead and already remarried. Some time later Charles’ mother threw herself off a building to commit suicide. A few years later Charles encountered a man who through pure random chance and conversation, revealed the mother had struck the pavement beside his feet and died in front of him. And so the story continued…
Charles has actually written a book about his life. “Boy…a journey to manhood”. He promptly sent me a copy as promised when we got back to England. I’m looking forward to reading it. Certainly one of life’s Characters!

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Morocco road sign for Casablanca - photoshop filter used

Morocco road sign for Casablanca – quick detour to see Rick’s Bar?

Morocco - the local garage - men at work

Morocco – the local garage

 

Morocco - football and fire

Morocco – football and fire

Football and fire. Kids play football on a large expanse of waste ground whilst a young boys watches a fire.

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Morocco, Marrakech, quiet day at the shop

Marrakech, quiet day at the shop

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Continue to next part… {click}

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2 thoughts on “Travel: Morocco – March 2014 (part 3)

  1. You don’t expect to see Charles Reeves while looking at photos of Essaouira – pops up in the most unlikely of places!!

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